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Nicola Perry

Research Affiliate

Department of Materials Science and Engineering
Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA

WPI Assistant Professor
International Institute for Carbon-Neutral Energy Research (I2CNER)
Kyushu University, Fukuoka, Japan

Postdoctoral Research Associate (9/2012-8/2014)
International Institute for Carbon-Neutral Energy Research (I2CNER)
Kyushu University, Fukuoka, Japan

Visiting Scholar (11/2012-9/2014)
Department of Materials Science and Engineering
Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA

Postdoctoral Fellow (10/2009-8/2012)
Energy Frontier Research Center for Inverse Design
Northwestern University, Evanston, IL

Ph.D., Materials Science and Engineering (2009)
Northwestern University, Evanston, IL

B.S., Materials Science and Engineering (2005)
Rice University, Houston, TX

B.A., French Studies (2005)
Rice University, Houston, TX

MIT Contact Info

77 Massachusetts Avenue
Room 13-3130
Cambridge, MA 02139 USA
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Nicola’s research interests lie broadly in the area of microstructure – crystal structure – defect chemistry – electrical property relationships of energy conversion oxides.  A particular interest is understanding the defect chemistry and thermodynamics of interfaces, such as grain boundaries and surfaces, in order to engineer oxides with new properties for enhanced energy conversion efficiency.

Current research aims to improve the oxygen exchange rate in thin film Sr(Ti,Fe)O3-δ-based solid oxide fuel cell cathodes by tailoring the electronic structure.  To this end, model cathodes are grown by PLD, and their performance measured by impedance spectroscopy is correlated to their in situ electronic structure and surface chemistry.  Nicola also investigates electrical properties of graphene and graphene oxide (collaboration with Stephen Lyth in I2CNER).  Previously she has worked on development of p-type transparent conducting oxides and nano-ionics for fuel cell electrolytes.